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Rastin Mehr

Rastin Mehr

March 24 2010

What does "Reusable Folksonomy API" mean?

A questions was asked that what does reusable folksonomy mean on the Anahita project roadmap

The Anahita Social Engine ™ reusable folksonomy API allows developers to easily add tagging feature to their social apps. Let's say if you are developing a blog, you can use this API to add tagging functionality to your blog posts and it would work seamlessly with the rest of your Anahita installation.

Folksonmy is the same as Folk+Taxonomy which means instead of the website content administrators defining the taxonomy and categorization on the contents and things, "Folks" and community members participate in the act of labeling and categorizing content or even each other. If you go to Flickr.com all the photographs can be tagged both by the authors and the community members, and that is how tag clouds are formed. Looking at a photographer's tag cloud you can get an idea of a photographer's genre and by clicking on the tags you get a filtered view of search results by the tag.

In Anahita 0.9.4 Nodes+Graphs+Stories everything is made out of nodes and edges. People, groups, events, photos, topics, story items, etc. are all nodes. The relationship amongst the nodes are maintained by the social graph, and almost all the nodes are commentable and taggable. #anahita #social #development

Thank you for the explanation. I haven't quite grasped the value of tags, apparently. I just think of them as a new name (or short name) for metatags, but apparently tags work on several levels, not just the meta level.

Well, if metatags are the taxonomy (controlled by the webmaster), whereas Tags are contributed by the community (anyone can add tags) then tags are the folksonmy.

Or part of it anyway. Is there anything other than tags that contributes to the social cloud?

So, reusable folksonmy means that tags from any part of Anahita will contribute to a person's social cloud? And, Anahita's social cloud will be shared with the Amazon social cloud so that means that "my" social cloud will become recognizable on the internet-at-large?

What if I don't like my social cloud? Can I delete it? Being user-contributed, this could get ugly at times. Imagine if a married couple began broadcasting their marital troubles through the social cloud. Ewww. Black clouds. Storm clouds. Who needs the National Enquirer, just go look up somebody's Social Cloud to see what people REALLY think of them.

I wonder why they left the second O out of it. Folksonmy. Taxonomy. Everybody's confused about how to spell it.
Rastin Mehr
Rastin Mehr
March 26 2010 Permalink
Is there anything other than tags that contributes to the social cloud?

Tags can be added to any nodes (people, groups, events, topics, story items, blog posts, photos, etc. ) The idea is that all (or most) nodes within Anahita are taggable and commentable by the community members.

There are some restrictions for example only the author of the tag/comment, the admin, or the owner of the node (person owning a photo, a group owning a photo) can edit or delete a tag/comment.

By the way the term "social cloud" is not technically correct. "Social Graph" is more accurate. Wikipedia Description

Reusable Folksonomy API means that Anahita Social Engine provides Application Programing Interface (API) so developers can easily add folksonomy functionality to the social applications that they develop (photos, blogs, events, ) and the tagging functionality will work seamlessly with the Anahita Social Engine as a whole.

And, Anahita's social cloud will be shared with the Amazon social cloud so that means that "my" social cloud will become recognizable on the internet-at-large?

There is no such a thing as Amazon Social Cloud. I think you are confusing Cloud computing with the social graph. The Amazon Simple Storage System (S3) that Anahita uses is simply a massive storage system on the Amazon's server farm where all the pictures are uploaded and stored. If you are running a social network, storing images locally on your shared hosting could lead to all kinds of administration difficulties.

What if I don't like my social cloud? Can I delete it?
People can always unfollow each other at will. That is not up to us to decide. We only provide options.



I've been involved almost exclusively with Joomla and I haven't encountered tags, clouds, social graphs very much... although I've seen it from time to time. It's big with WordPress and other blog systems, I believe. Joomla hasn't had a really great blog system. I'm using Lyftenbloggie now and I like it. But I don't have the pings working. My server manager needs to turn something on so it will ping Technorati. From what I understand, "pinging" has something to do with distributing the tags, too.

Back to Anahita... It seems you're introducing something new, then. Not entirely new but new to Joomla. Social tags. Social Graph. The words folksonmy and taxonomy are not in the JED anywhere.

"Tag Clouds" is in the JED, but it's all about articles content or Virtuemart products. Not social graph. And "Cloud Storage" is in the JED, but cloud storage is not the same thing.

No wonder I'm confused. I'll go read up on it some more... Thank you for the link to Wikipedia.

[quote]If you are running a social network, storing images locally on your shared hosting could lead to all kinds of administration difficulties.[/quote]

Yes, I understand that very well. And yet everybody EXPECTS a webmaster to provide unlimited storage space for enormous photos (why should they learn anything about resizing anyway?) Unfortunately, that's the way a lot of people think. Including my spoiled rotten niece. And Amazon is willing to do this for a reasonable fee?

You have some very specific selling points in all of this, Rastin. I didn't realize quite how progressive Anahita is.

I've been involved almost exclusively with Joomla and I haven't encountered tags, clouds, social graphs very much... although I've seen it from time to time. It's big with WordPress and other blog systems, I believe. Joomla hasn't had a really great blog system. I'm using Lyftenbloggie now and I like it. But I don't have the pings working. My server manager needs to turn something on so it will ping Technorati. From what I understand, "pinging" has something to do with distributing the tags, too.

Back to Anahita... It seems you're introducing something new, then. Not entirely new but new to Joomla. Social tags. Social Graph. The words folksonmy and taxonomy are not in the JED anywhere.

"Tag Clouds" is in the JED, but it's all about articles content or Virtuemart products. Not social graph. And "Cloud Storage" is in the JED, but cloud storage is not the same thing.

No wonder I'm confused. I'll go read up on it some more... Thank you for the link to Wikipedia.

If you are running a social network, storing images locally on your shared hosting could lead to all kinds of administration difficulties.

Yes, I understand that very well. And yet everybody EXPECTS a webmaster to provide unlimited storage space for enormous photos (why should they learn anything about resizing anyway?) Unfortunately, that's the way a lot of people think. Including my spoiled rotten niece. And Amazon is willing to do this for a reasonable fee?

You have some very specific selling points in all of this, Rastin. I didn't realize how progressive Anahita is.

OK... that's a BUG REPORT. :) I couldn't EDIT my entry. Well, I could Edit the entry but it refused to SAVE it and when I hit CANCEL instead, it deleted the entry entirely. Gone, it was not there.

So then I went back a screen and managed to recover what I had written, and it still wouldn't SAVE in the EDIT field, so I cut the text from the EDIT field and just entered the whole thing as a new REPLY instead (the EDIT field and the REPLY fields were on the same page.)

So now BOTH of them are posted. Arggh.



Rastin Mehr
Rastin Mehr
March 26 2010 Permalink
Thank you for the report. Having both edit and reply fields is normal and expected. You should be able to have as many editable fields on the page if you like.

Not saving is a bug!
Rastin Mehr
Rastin Mehr
March 26 2010 Permalink
@cyndy - read this blog post. Joomla has been primarily used and promoted as a content management system which is at least 2-3 evolutionary stage before what a social network is. A lot of those concepts and new keywords belong to the domain of Read/Write web and Social Web.

Evolution of websites
Here is some stuff I found in several articles on Wikipedia:

Tagging was popularized by websites associated with Web 2.0 and is an important feature of many Web 2.0 services. It is now also part of some desktop software.

The term "Web 2.0" (2004–present) is commonly associated with web applications that facilitate interactive information sharing, interoperability, user-centered design,[1] and collaboration on the World Wide Web. Examples of Web 2.0 include web-based communities, hosted services, web applications, social-networking sites, video-sharing sites, wikis, blogs, mashups, and folksonomies. A Web 2.0 site allows its users to interact with other users or to change website content, in contrast to non-interactive websites where users are limited to the passive viewing of information that is provided to them.

The term is closely associated with Tim O'Reilly because of the O'Reilly Media Web 2.0 conference in 2004.[2][3] Although the term suggests a new version of the World Wide Web, it does not refer to an update to any technical specifications, but rather to cumulative changes in the ways software developers and end-users use the Web. Whether Web 2.0 is qualitatively different from prior web technologies has been challenged by World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee, who called the term a "piece of jargon"[4] — precisely because he intended the Web to embody these values in the first place.

A folksonomy is a system of classification derived from the practice and method of collaboratively creating and managing tags to annotate and categorize content;[1][2] this practice is also known as collaborative tagging, social classification, social indexing, and social tagging.

Folksonomies became popular on the Web around 2004[3] as part of social software applications such as social bookmarking and photograph annotation. Tagging, which is characteristic of Web 2.0 services, allows users to collectively classify and find information. Some websites include tag clouds as a way to visualize tags in a folksonomy.[4]

See also: Collective intelligence

This is cool stuff. Tags are apparently more effective than metatags? I wonder why.

When you say that your social engine has REUSABLE Folksonmy, it means that other programs can use your API to plug into an installation of the Anahita social engine, and the folksonmy of a particular node or node cluster is shareable. Yes, I can see that's good too. This is a whole new way of sharing.

Unlike forums which are sorta boxed up. The collective intelligence of a forum doesn't leak out much at all. The only way to find the collective intelligence is to use SEARCH, and to search a forum for information is actually a tedious process.

Is there a central place where tags are shared? What's the use of a folksonmy if it's just locked up within one Anahita social club? How does the folksonmy get shared with the rest of the internet?

If there isn't a central brain-cloud there should be. Although that's actually a scary thought, come to think of it. A central intelligence that could probe all the intelligences of all the web 2.0 folksonmies? Yikes.

Ok, I found an article at this link (which I did not download because it cost $25 to get it), but the introduction seems to be exactly what you are doing here with Anahita. I am now familiar with Semantic web, too, which is part of this entire discussion because it's sort of the ultimate Goal of tags, folksonmy and ontology:

http://jis.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/36/1/57

Websites that provide content creation and sharing features have become quite popular recently. These sites allow users to categorize and browse content using ‘tags’ or free-text keyword topics.

Since users contribute and tag social media content across a variety of social web platforms, creating new knowledge from distributed tag data has become a matter of performing various tasks, including publishing, aggregating, integrating, and republishing tag data.

However, there are a number of issues in relation to data sharing and interoperability when processing tag data across heterogeneous tagging platforms. In this paper we introduce a semantic tag model that aims to explicitly offer the necessary structure, semantics and relationships between tags. This approach provides an improved opportunity for representing tag data in the form of reusable constructs at a semantic level. We also demonstrate a prototype that consumes and makes use of shared tag metadata across heterogeneous sources.

That last paragraph addresses the question I had in the previous post... Once Anahita has assembled the folksonmy, THEN what do you do with it so that it can become part of the Semantic web? :) -- I do understand that the Semantic web is still evolving. It is more of a goal, at this point, than a reality.

And, does the Anahita model for folksonmy have the necessary contructs to be able to share folksonmy data across multiple platforms? -- I understand that such standards may not yet exist, but I would assume somebody is working on it. Which is what that article is about, apparently.

Yes, Joomla is way overdue for what Anahita has to offer.




I was thinking Tags had something to do with Trackbacks. They don't. I haven't been involved with blogs, I've been doing Joomla. In order to use Joomla for blogging, you must already know how blogs work.

It seems that trackbacks have more value when you're part of a blogging network and everybody in your neck of the woods (niche market) is using the same blogging network you are so there's a lot of linking going on.

Joomla doesn't work like that. We could use Ping-o-matic or Technorati, but I still wonder how people are going to find your blog exactly. What good is a trackback service if nobody knows your blog exists? I kinda think that if your big thing is blogging and you want to get famous doing it, it's best to sign up with the popular blogging networks than try to start a Joomla blog.

So, folksonmy is not going to do the things that trackbacks do. I thought it would. A tag cloud is more of a visual representation of a person. What their interests are, what they talk about the most.

Apparently Tags can and do get picked up by search engines, more than trackbacks do.

Tags and trackbacks are an important part of online socializing and sharing. Things like this are filling in the "gaps" in what Joomla offers.




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